When Carl Edwards Fell Afoul of NASCAR’s Yellow Line Rule in 2006

In Formula One, there is a track limits rule where drivers are penalized for taking a shortcut off the track. NASCAR has a similar rule, called the double yellow line rule. The double yellow line essentially acts as the track limits in NASCAR. Back in 2006, during the Budweiser Shootout before the Daytona 500, Carl Edwards fell victim to this.

In all honesty, the double yellow line has often led to many controversies in the sport. During that 2006 season, Edwards was trying to avoid causing an accident in the closing stages of the race. Apparently, many cars began to slow down for their pit stops, so he moved below the line. With that, he managed to overtake Kyle Busch and Jimmie Johnson, but two other cars overtook him.

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What punishment did NASCAR give Carl Edwards?

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Unfortunately, NASCAR did not see things his way and ruled that he passed cars after crossing the yellow line. As a result, they slapped him with a pass through penalty, and he was fuming. He declared that he would not serve such an unjust penalty, but eventually relented and served it. The bad news was that the drama did not stop there, as NASCAR adjudged that he was speeding while serving the penalty.

HOMESTEAD, FL – NOVEMBER 19: Carl Edwards, driver of the #99 Aflac Ford, climbs out of his car after qualifying for pole position in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Ford 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on November 19, 2011 in Homestead, Florida . (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

Now in a towering rage, the Roush Racing driver simply upped and quit the race entirely. He said afterwards, “NASCAR asked me to come up there and they spent a great amount of time and energy explaining their position to me. I totally understand their position. They understand my position. The call was made and we’re just gonna go on. That’s all we can do. I respect what they tried to explain to me and I know exactly what they’re saying. I didn’t see that at the time and almost got myself in real trouble by not pulling in.”

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In the end, he must have been glad that it was not much worse than it already was. As it happened, he had already dipped below the yellow line to avoid Kasey Kahne and got sent to the back of the field. All in all, it was a wretched day in the office for the #99 driver.

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